LEH News Updates

As we come to the end of another challenging pandemic year, we thought you might enjoy a reminder of some of the gorgeous East Harlem historic structures that have stood the test of time. Click the photos to learn more about these neighborhood treasures!
This week, as we enjoy a time-honored Thanksgiving holiday where our nation gives thanks for the colonizing efforts of Europeans to create our current America, we should pause to reflect on and honor the remarkable, original stewards of this land we call home. Indigenous history is this land’s foundation, and we have a lot to learn from indigenous peoples’ past and present stewardship of our beloved landscapes.
With October 15th marking the end to Hispanic Heritage Month, we thought we would spotlight an impressive NYC Landmark that has beautiful and deeply rooted ties to the Hispanic community of East Harlem. Designated as an Individual Landmark by the Landmarks Preservation Commission in 1996, 1674 Lexington Avenue currently houses the Julia De Burgos Latino Cultural Center, but first began its life as Public School 72.
Saint Cecilia’s Church, built from 1883-87, is located at 120 East 106th Street in the section of East Harlem known as “El Barrio,” between Lexington and Park Avenues. The church was one of the first religious institutions built in the area. The building’s function as a Roman Catholic Parish has been in continuous use since 1884.
The former Manhattan Odd Fellows Temple located at 105 E 106th Street has been home to numerous establishments throughout the years, including the first recording studio in Harlem.
This month we are celebrating neighborhood sites that have played a central role in Harlem's LGBT+ history. We are bringing you some histories of queer spaces with the help of the NYC LGBT Historic Sites Project. This groundbreaking project has helped map hundreds of important queer historic spaces in New York.
This month we are celebrating important landmarks and preservation work in East Harlem. But already, 2021 has been chock-full of preservation news! We're bringing you the highlights and sharing all the details about current preservation action alerts and demolition threats to our neighborhood treasures.
Landmark East Harlem Virtual Tour for MAS Jane's Walk 2021
Landmark East Harlem and Uptown Grand Central present an Instagram Live tour of East Harlem

LEH News Updates

As we come to the end of another challenging pandemic year, we thought you might enjoy a reminder of some of the gorgeous East Harlem historic structures that have stood the test of time. Click the photos to learn more about these neighborhood treasures!
This week, as we enjoy a time-honored Thanksgiving holiday where our nation gives thanks for the colonizing efforts of Europeans to create our current America, we should pause to reflect on and honor the remarkable, original stewards of this land we call home. Indigenous history is this land’s foundation, and we have a lot to learn from indigenous peoples’ past and present stewardship of our beloved landscapes.
With October 15th marking the end to Hispanic Heritage Month, we thought we would spotlight an impressive NYC Landmark that has beautiful and deeply rooted ties to the Hispanic community of East Harlem. Designated as an Individual Landmark by the Landmarks Preservation Commission in 1996, 1674 Lexington Avenue currently houses the Julia De Burgos Latino Cultural Center, but first began its life as Public School 72.
Take our Historic & Cultural Resource SurveyTell us about the spaces and places you love!

Fill out the 5 minute El Barrio/East Harlem Community Survey and tell us what special neighborhood sites and buildings matter most to you!

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